Haute Muse Social | Culture Vulture: Mohican Couture

HAUTE MUSE SOCIAL | CULTURE VULTURE | S/S 2013 HAIR TRENDS

photo: Murielle Mondesir posing for Graffiti Mimosa, rocking her “frohawk” and cool earrings too!

Let’s briefly begin with the origin of the Mohawk hairstyle also known as the Mohican, a name from the Mohawk Nation (calling themselves the “People of Light” in their Mohawk language) or the hairstyle was known as the Iro, referring to the Iroquois Nation (aka the Haudenosaunee or the “People of the Longhouse”) from whom the actual hairstyle is derived. Originally the Mohawks and the Iroquois Confederation’s true Mohican hairstyle was to pluck-out the hairs from both sides of the scalp a piece at-a-time (OUCH!!) leaving a 3″ square patch of hair around the back of the crown with 3 short braids to be decorated. The Pawnee Nation, of Oklahoma and currently live in Kansas and Nebraska, also adapted to wearing a “Mohawk” hairstyle.
 

photo credit: Mohican man 1750s by Adam J Hall

A hairstyle that has been in existence for many, many years spreading throughout other parts of the world. In 2003, researchers found in Dublin a 2000 year old male, Iron-age bog body classified as a Clonycavan man, supposedly wearing a mohawk inspired style made of pine resin and plant oil. Artwork dating back to 600 B.C. that was found on a Pazyryk burial ground, shows a warrior sporting a similar mohawk style. A khokhol a hairstyle worn by 16th-Century ethnic Ukrainians called Cossacks would shave their heads braiding the middle or put it up in a top-knot. Even soldiers of the Vietnam War and the paratroopers of the 101st Airborne during WWII wore mohawks to intimidate their enemies.

https://i1.wp.com/upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/2f/PazyrikHorseman.JPG/220px-PazyrikHorseman.JPG

photo credit: Horseman, Pazyryk felt artifact, c.300 BC

Over time this rebellious hairstyle has developed within diverse cultures into a narrow strip of hair from the forehead to the nape of the neck with the side shaved completely bald. Depending on how an individual wears it — keeping the sides clean-shaven, blow drying it out, twisting it, special hair cut shapes or patterns on the side, adding gels or using hairsprays — maintaining a Mohawk can be high-maintenance.

The mohawk hairstyle can deviate from the single narrow strip of hair into many variations such as:

From the 70s to present day, mohawks varied in style: liberty spikes – single color or dyed spikes down the center, frohawk – hair twists or braids on the side or pinned up on the sides, death hawk – a style common in goth cultures or chelsea hawk – a mohawk with bangs.

Then there’s: Dreadhawk – usually hair extensions in neon colors falling long, a nohawk or reverse mohawk – shave the middle leaving hair on the sides, fohawk or faux hawk – short spike in the middle without shaving the sides, pony hawk – long ponytails down the middle with hair on the sides and the curlhawk or curly hawk – short or long curls in the middle with hair on the sides.

I was able to snap a few photos of people who are part of the new “Mohican Couture” of pop culture. Thank you ladies for

Lady Camille photo credit: LeidhiBugSOL for Graffiti Mimosa

photos: Lady Camille walking around wearing “liberty spikes” with blue dyed tips

DSC05384.MAY-7-2013.GRAFFITI MIMOSA

photo credit: LeidhiBugSOL for Graffiti Mimosa

Graffiti Mimosa.May-27-2013.Shaquira Thomas.collage

Shaquira D. Thomas of Divine Styles, specializes in natural hairstyles. Shaquira’s look could be a pony hawk or a frohawk, either way its a good look for her. How could you not love her eyewear and bangles.

young man wearing a mohawk with tattoos

young man probably wearing a “death hawk” with his tattoo

Are you currently wearing a mohawk? If so, share your photos on our fan page here.

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